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PBS Short Film Festival 2021
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Now entering its 10th year, the PBS Short Film Festival is a celebration of independent films and filmmaking. Join us in exploring an incredible selection of 25 captivating films about identity, society, culture, family, race, and humanity in this annual showcase of powerful and unexpected stories. Two of the selected short films featured are Oklahoma-focused. 

The investigative short Deadly Jails looks at how advocacy organizations like the Mental Health Association of Oklahoma are trying to change the way these counties handle urgent mental health situations.

A Call Away examines Oklahoma's “failure to protect” law. The film shows how the law has contributed to a cycle of family separation and trauma. 

Watch them both below. For the full slate and to stream all of the short films selected, click here.  

PBS Short Film Festival

Deadly Jails

13:28
Published:
Expires: 2023-07-12

Christina Dawn Tahhahwah of the Comanche Nation suffered from mental illness and died in an Oklahoma jail. Brittany Weide, who was bipolar and suffered from addiction, after being incarcerated for sleeping outside and carrying illegal drugs, committed suicide in her cell. Like many states, Oklahoma has no mechanisms in place for handling or treating incarcerated people with mental illness. This investigative short looks at how advocacy organizations like the Mental Health Association of Oklahoma are trying to change the way these counties handle urgent mental health situations.

PBS Short Film Festival

A Call Away

9:18
Published:
Expires: 2023-07-12

Oklahoma is one of 26 states with a “failure to protect” law, which prosecutes parents who fail to prevent child abuse. However, the ACLU and other groups say this law disproportionately criminalizes women, who are often victims of domestic abuse themselves. Hear the story of Clorinda Archuleta, a mother of twin boys, both of whom suffered severe injuries as infants. Clorinda and her ex-boyfriend pled guilty, but Clorinda received three consecutive life sentences under the Oklahoma law, while her partner was sentenced to 25 years. As Clorinda seeks commutation, the film shows how the law has contributed to a cycle of family separation and trauma.